AEI 8:261-271 (2016)  -  DOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/aei00168

Distribution and seasonal variation of picoplankton in Sanggou Bay, China

Li Zhao1,2, Yuan Zhao1,2,*, Jianhong Xu1,2, Wuchang Zhang1,2, Lingfeng Huang3, Zengjie Jiang4,5, Jianguang Fang4,5, Tian Xiao1,2

1Key Laboratory of Marine Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, PR China
2Laboratory of Marine Ecology and Environmental Science, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266071, PR China
3Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, PR China
4Key Laboratory of Sustainable Development of Marine Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture, Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Qingdao 266071, PR China
5Function Laboratory for Marine Fisheries Science and Food Production Processes, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266071, PR China
*Corresponding author:

ABSTRACT: Picoplankton abundance and biomass in Sanggou Bay, China, were investigated in 4 successive seasons (April, August and October 2011, January 2012). Different distribution patterns of picoplankton abundance and biomass were observed according to season and culture areas (bivalves or macroalgae). Synechococcus, picoeukaryotes and heterotrophic prokaryotes exhibited higher abundance and biomass in warm seasons (summer and autumn) than in cold seasons (spring and winter). Over all 4 seasons, picoplankton abundance was higher in the bivalve culture area than in the macroalgae culture area. Among picoplankton, picoeukaryotes contributed most to the carbon standing stock in summer and autumn. In spring and winter, the heterotrophic component biomass exceeded that of the autotrophic picoplankton. Picoeukaryotes were an important contributor (21-27%) to total phytoplankton carbon biomass in spring to autumn. In spring, heterotrophic prokaryote biomass accounted for more than 56% of total phytoplankton biomass, and even exceeded phytoplankton biomass at some stations. As revealed by multiple stepwise regression analysis, physicochemical factors and protist grazing were the most important variables that controlled picoplankton distribution and variation. The reduction in grazing pressure, as well as phosphorus release by bivalves, is likely to explain the higher abundance of picoplankton in the bivalve culture area of Sanggou Bay.


KEY WORDS: Synechococcus · Picoeukaryotes · Heterotrophic prokaryotes · Sanggou Bay


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Cite this article as: Zhao L, Zhao Y, Xu J, Zhang W and others (2016) Distribution and seasonal variation of picoplankton in Sanggou Bay, China. Aquacult Environ Interact 8:261-271. https://doi.org/10.3354/aei00168

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