DAO 64:5-12 (2005)  -  doi:10.3354/dao064005

Differences in susceptibility of palaemonid shrimp species to yellow head virus (YHV) infection

Siwaporn Longyant1, Paisarn Sithigorngul1,*, Parin Chaivisuthangkura1, Sombat Rukpratanporn2, Weerawan Sithigorngul1, Piamsak Menasveta3

1Department of Biology, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110, Thailand
2Marine Biotechnology Research Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment, and 3Department of Marine Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
*Corresponding author. Email:

ABSTRACT: Five species of palaemonid shrimp, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, M. lanchesteri, M. sintangense, Palaemon styliferus and P. serrifer, were collected from Penaeus monodon farming areas in Thailand. Some of each species were artificially infected with yellow head virus (YHV) by injection and then monitored by RT-PCR and by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific to 116 kDa, 64 kDa, and 20 kDa proteins of YHV. Natural YHV infections were not detected in any of the shrimp examined. In YHV injection experiments, a high proportion of P. serrifer, P. styliferus and M. sintangense exhibited mild to moderate YHV infections at 3 d post-injection. The severity of infection was reduced in shrimp that survived to 10 and 30 d post-injection. Using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR, a small proportion of M. lanchesteri showed very mild YHV infections at Day 3 but no infections at Days 10 and 30. No YHV infections resulted in M. rosenbergii. The evidence suggested that M. sintangense, P. styliferus and P. serrifer are susceptible to YHV and carry it for some time. In contrast, M. rosenbergii and M. lanchesteri appear to resist YHV infection and eliminate YHV efficiently. Because they display a range of responses to YHV, palaemonid shrimp may serve as a good model for studying YHV defense mechanisms in shrimp.


KEY WORDS: Carrier · Immunohistochemistry · Macrobrachium lanchesteri · M. rosenbergii · M. sintangense · Palaemon serrifer · P. styliferus · Yellow head virus · YHV


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