DAO 96:137-143 (2011)  -  DOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/dao02379

Local patchiness of Gyrodactylus colemanensis and G. salmonis parasitizing salmonids in the South River watershed, Nova Scotia, Canada

Ping You1,*, John MacMillan2, David Cone3

1College of Life Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062, PR China
2Nova Scotia Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Pictou, Nova Scotia B0K 1H0, Canada
3Department of Biology, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3C3, Canada

ABSTRACT: Prevalence and intensity of Gyrodactylus colemanensis and G. salmonis (Monogenea) parasitizing juvenile/adult brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar at 3 localities over an 8 km stretch in the South River, Nova Scotia, Canada, were calculated 4 times over a 9 mo period (Oc­tober 2009, December 2009, March 2010, June 2010). G. colemanensis was on all 4 salmonids (endemic and non-endemic), while G. salmonis parasitized mostly S. fontinalis (endemic) and occasionally S. trutta (non-endemic). At an upstream locality, beyond a waterfall barrier, in a small tributary of the main river, G. colemanensis was more common than G. salmonis. In the main river, 7 km downstream, prevalence of G. colemanensis on S. fontinalis was comparable, or higher, than that of G. salmonis, while intensity of G. salmonis was higher than that of G. colemanensis. Downstream a further 1 km, in a tributary of the main river, both prevalence and intensity of G. salmonis on brook trout were higher than those of G. colemanensis. Stocks at a local trout hatchery had only G. colemanensis. The present study reports on a method by which exit water from such farms can be monitored for gyrodactylid parasites through a simple settling procedure. We estimated that up to 230000 dislodged, live G. colemanensis exit the hatchery daily in discharge water entering the river. It is suggested that such systems are ideal for studying the impact of such parasite export on the nature of local parasite populations.


KEY WORDS: Prevalence · Intensity · Gyrodactylus colemanensis · Gyrodactylus salmonis · South River · Salmonids · Nova Scotia · Canada


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Cite this article as: You P, MacMillan J, Cone D (2011) Local patchiness of Gyrodactylus colemanensis and G. salmonis parasitizing salmonids in the South River watershed, Nova Scotia, Canada. Dis Aquat Org 96:137-143. https://doi.org/10.3354/dao02379

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