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Marine Ecology Progress Series

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MEPS 646:145-160 (2020)  -  DOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/meps13383

Spatial and interannual variability of juvenile coho salmon growth in the Strait of Georgia (2012-2015)

Meredith L. Journey1,*, Chrys Neville2, Graham Young3, Marc Trudel4, Brian R. Beckman5

1Lynker Technologies under contract to Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112, USA
2Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6N7, Canada
3School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, 1122 NE Boat St, Seattle, WA 98105, USA
4St. Andrews Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. Andrews, NB E5B 0E4, Canada
5Environmental and Fisheries Sciences Division, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112, USA
*Corresponding author:

ABSTRACT: We conducted a 4 yr (2012-2015) study of regional growth of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch in the Strait of Georgia (British Columbia, Canada). Size (fork length) and growth (insulin-like growth factor-1 [IGF-1] concentration) varied both regionally and inter-annually. Additionally, we found a positive relationship between IGF-1 concentration and fork length that varied between years, with slopes and y-intercepts higher in 2012 and 2014, respectively, as compared to 2013 and 2015. An ordinal increase of IGF-1 concentration from the south to north in 2012 and 2014 was coupled with an increase in the prevalence of both juvenile herring and juveniles of other fish species in the diet. Across all years, there was a positive relationship between regional mean IGF-1 concentration and regional mean percent of juvenile herring in the diet. Our study demonstrates relatively small-scale spatial heterogeneity in juvenile coho salmon growth that in part, was attributed to regional variation in diet. These findings also demonstrate the utility of short-term growth measures (such as IGF-1) for assessing relatively small-scale spatial and temporal differences in growth.


KEY WORDS: Juvenile salmon · Oncorhynchus · Growth · Strait of Georgia · Insulin-like growth factor-1 · IGF-1 · Diet · Coho salmon


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Cite this article as: Journey ML, Neville C, Young G, Trudel M, Beckman BR (2020) Spatial and interannual variability of juvenile coho salmon growth in the Strait of Georgia (2012-2015). Mar Ecol Prog Ser 646:145-160. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps13383

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