DAO SPECIAL 8:

Image: Paul D. Stebbing (Cefas)

Amphipod disease: model systems, invasions and systematics

 

Over 10,000 amphipod species are known around the globe from freshwater, marine and terrestrial habitats, making them one of the most diverse crustacean groups. Amphipods often feature as nutrient recyclers and prey species, thus being crucial supporters of ecosystems and their inhabitants. In addition, many amphipods are readily available model organisms for studying crustacean development, invasion dynamics, ecotoxicology, and disease, and recent evidence suggests that amphipods are parasitized by some unique symbionts, whose taxonomy remains intriguing and unexplored.

 

Like most organisms, amphipods suffer from diseases that can alter the availability and dynamics of certain ecosystem services, and affect their performance as model organisms. However, despite the important role of many amphipods in ecosystems and scientific research, studies aimed at furthering our understanding of amphipod diseases are sparse.

 

Contributions to this Special Issue will expand our knowledge about amphipod diseases by exploring how amphipod models can be used to research the dynamics of disease effects (e.g. in biological invasions, ecotoxicology, and epidemiology) and as a source for the discovery of novel and ancient lineages of parasites.

 

Authors interested in contributing to this Special Issue may contact Jamie Bojko (jamie.bojko(at)ufl.edu). The submission deadline is currently set for September 30th, 2018.

 

Idea: Jamie Bojko

Editor: Jeffrey Shields


Individual articles in this Special are published 'Advance View' as soon as they are ready. Once the Special is completed, they will be fully published in a regular issue of DAO and given an issue number and page range. Literature cites to other articles in the Special will also be updated.


Bojko J, Stentiford GD, Stebbing PD, Hassall C, Deacon A, Cargill B, Pile B, Dunn AM

Pathogens of Dikerogammarus haemobaphes regulate host activity and survival, but also threaten native amphipod populations in the UK

MEPS TS SPF:AV 1 | Full text in pdf format