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Marine Ecology Progress Series

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MEPS 524:39-53 (2015)  -  DOI: https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11144

Under-ice microbial dimethylsulfoniopropionate metabolism during the melt period in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

Virginie Galindo1,7,*, Maurice Levasseur1, Michael Scarratt2, Christopher John Mundy3, Michel Gosselin4, Ronald P. Kiene5,6, Margaux Gourdal1, Martine Lizotte1

1Département de biologie, Québec-Océan, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada
2Maurice Lamontagne Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Mont-Joli, Québec G5H 3Z4, Canada
3Centre for Earth Observation Science (CEOS), Faculty of Environment, Earth and Resources, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada
4Institut des sciences de la mer de Rimouski (ISMER), Université du Québec à Rimouski, Rimouski, Québec G5L 3A1, Canada
5Department of Marine Sciences, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama 36688, USA
6Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528, USA
7Present address: Centre for Earth Observation Science (CEOS), Faculty of Environment, Earth and Resources, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada
*Corresponding author:

ABSTRACT: This study reports on the temporal variations in algal and bacterial metabolism of dissolved dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPd) in Arctic ice-covered waters in response to the release of organic matter (OM) from the sea ice and the onset of under-ice phytoplankton growth. Sampling took place between 21 May and 21 June 2012 at a station located in Resolute Passage. A snow and ice melt event was accompanied by an important release of OM and total DMSP from the bottom ice to the water column. This input of OM coincided with increases in DMSPd and DMSPd loss rate constant at the ice-water interface and, 2 days later, with increases in DMSPd and bacterial dimethylsulfide (DMS) yields from DMSPd at 0.5 m under the ice. The different microbial responses suggest that DMSPd-rich brines were released first, followed by the release of sympagic algae due to ice melt. In both cases, the changes in DMSPd metabolism resulted in an increase in gross DMS production from 0.15 to 1.9 nmol l-1 d-1. The initiation of phytoplankton growth resulted in increases in bacterial abundance, DMSPd loss-rate constant and DMSP-sulfur assimilation. In contrast, DMS yield remained low during the onset of phytoplankton growth, indicating that bacteria used DMSP as a carbon and sulfur source. These results show that ice DMSPd can be rapidly (<1 d) and efficiently (up to 10%) converted into DMS by bacteria once released in surface water during melt events, a process that could contribute to DMS peaks measured at the ice edge.


KEY WORDS: Arctic · Ice melt ·  Dimethylsulfoniopropionate · DMSP · Dimethylsulfide · DMS · Bacterial metabolism


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Cite this article as: Galindo V, Levasseur M, Scarratt M, Mundy CJ and others (2015) Under-ice microbial dimethylsulfoniopropionate metabolism during the melt period in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 524:39-53. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11144

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